The american view point on weight and obesity

Quotes on Obesity and Obesity Prevention Research "Obesity contributes to overdeaths per year, principally through its association with cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and several cancers. Obesity currently is the second leading cause of preventable death and will soon surpass cigarette smoking, the leading cause.

The american view point on weight and obesity

Rafa Alvarez Advertisement For the 35 percent of American adults who do daily battle with obesity, the main causes of their condition are all too familiar: In recent years, however, researchers have become increasingly convinced that important hidden players literally lurk in human bowels: Throughout our evolutionary history, the microscopic denizens of our intestines have helped us break down tough plant fibers in exchange for the privilege of living in such a nutritious broth.

Yet their roles appear to extend beyond digestion. New evidence indicates that gut bacteria alter the way we store fat, how we balance levels of glucose in the blood, and how we respond to hormones that make us feel hungry or full. The wrong mix of microbes, it seems, can help set the stage for obesity and diabetes from the moment of birth.

Fortunately, researchers are beginning to understand the differences between the wrong mix and a healthy one, as well as the specific factors that shape those differences. They hope to learn how to cultivate this inner ecosystem in ways that could prevent—and possibly treat—obesity, which doctors define as having a particular ratio of height and weight, known as the body mass index, that is greater than Imagine, for example, foods, baby formulas or supplements devised to promote virtuous microbes while suppressing the harmful types.

Keeping our gut microbes happy could be the elusive secret to weight control. An Inner Rain Forest Researchers have long known that the human body is home to all manner of microorganisms, but only in the past decade or so have they come to realize that these microbes outnumber our own cells 10 to one.

Each of us begins to assemble a unique congregation of microbes the moment we pass through the birth canal, acquiring our mother's bacteria first and continuing to gather new members from the environment throughout life. By studying the genes of these various microbes—collectively referred to as the microbiome—investigators have identified many of the most common residents, although these can vary greatly from person to person and among different human populations.

In recent years researchers have begun the transition from mere census taking to determining the kind of jobs these minute inhabitants fill in the human body and the effect they have on our overall health.

An early hint that gut microbes might play a role in obesity came from studies comparing intestinal bacteria in obese and lean individuals.

The american view point on weight and obesity

In studies of twins who were both lean or both obese, researchers found that the gut community in lean people was like a rain forest brimming with many species but that the community in obese people was less diverse—more like a nutrient-overloaded pond where relatively few species dominate.

Lean individuals, for example, tended to have a wider variety of Bacteroidetes, a large tribe of microbes that specialize in breaking down bulky plant starches and fibers into shorter molecules that the body can use as a source of energy.

Documenting such differences does not mean the discrepancies are responsible for obesity, however. To demonstrate cause and effect, Gordon and his colleagues conducted an elegant series of experiments with so-called humanized mice, published last September in Science.

First, they raised genetically identical baby rodents in a germ-free environment so that their bodies would be free of any bacteria.

The american view point on weight and obesity

Then they populated their guts with intestinal microbes collected from obese women and their lean twin sisters three pairs of fraternal female twins and one set of identical twins were used in the studies. The mice ate the same diet in equal amounts, yet the animals that received bacteria from an obese twin grew heavier and had more body fat than mice with microbes from a thin twin.

As expected, the fat mice also had a less diverse community of microbes in the gut. Gordon's team then repeated the experiment with one small twist: This time both groups remained lean.

Studies showed that the mice carrying microbes from the obese human had picked up some of their lean roommates' gut bacteria—especially varieties of Bacteroidetes—probably by consuming their feces, a typical, if unappealing, mouse behavior.The average American is 23 pounds heavier than his or her ideal body weight.

If we equate "normal" with average, it's not much of a stretch to say it's normal to be fat. Obesity is a growing global health problem.

Obesity is when someone is so overweight that it is a threat to their health. Obesity typically results from over-eating (especially an . Weight Gain, Obesity & Cancer Risk. Excess weight is a known risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease.

Obesity can also be .

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CDC nutrition efforts support public health strategies and programs that improve dietary quality, support healthy child development, and reduce chronic disease. The values above the diet classes (blue boxes) correspond to the difference in mean weight lost between the columns and row at 12 months (eg, the difference in average weight lost between moderate macronutrients and no diet at 12 months is kg).

obesity -from the doctors point of view The results from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES,) estimate that 61% of US adults are either overweight or obese; adult obesity nearly doubled, increasing to 27%, during the 14 years of study [National Center for Health Statistics.

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