A synopsis of emperor of china self portrait of kang hsi

I've seen a lot of these films and tend to like them better than any other kind of ghost story, but this is easily one of the best I've yet seen, thanks chiefly to the central performances of actress Li Li Hua, playing the male scholar Yue Wei, and Li Ching in a dual role as the ghost of Lian Suo, a woman who died defending herself from a rapacious noble seeking to force her into marriage, and the ghost's living sister, Lian Wei, whose petulance contrasts with the sweet, generous and studious demeanor of the dead girl. Yue Wei is initially frightened at the presence of a ghost, but Lian Suo gradually assuages his fears and shares her love of poetry and art with him. A self portrait of Lian Suo, painted with remarkable detail, plays a key role in the courtship. At one point, the painting becomes a moving, speaking live-action image of Lian Suo and she leaps from it into the room, leaving a blank space on the painting.

A synopsis of emperor of china self portrait of kang hsi

Jun 05, Olivier Schmidt rated it it was amazing Beautifully written book that offers insights in the head of a man living a life of almost mythical proportions, considered by his subjects the connection between Heaven and Earth himself. As his own words and edicts are used, an honest account is given of his personal life, difficulties, beliefs and political views in ways that are not accessible of almost any other great leaders in history.

Highly recommended for those with a special interest in early modern Chinese history.

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Aug 13, Frank Stein rated it really liked it One of the strangest and most worthwhile books I've ever read on China. Back in the s, the historian Jonathan Spence realized that China's early modern history had few of the detailed autobiographies and personal memoirs so important to historians of the West.

Spence doesn't speculate on why, but he implies that the autocratic and hierarchical court and focus on official documents left little time for independent and personal literature.

Spence therefore worked to compile all the personal an One of the strangest and most worthwhile books I've ever read on China.

Spence therefore worked to compile all the personal anecdotes and reminiscences of the Emperor Kangxi, the second Qing emperor, who ruled from tothat were scattered about innumerable documents and notes, and he made a semi-coherent autobiography out of them.

Spence doesn't quite state where his edits and organizations end and where Kangxi's voice begins, but one does feel that he strove to convey Kangxi's personality and words as honestly as possible. Unlike so many other early histories of China, one gets the sense from this book of a real individual.

Kangxi was obsessed with his health and aging, and his regular laments on his teeth and dizziness can be tiring. But he was also dedicated to touring his domain and collecting the plants and flowers he found there.

He regularly celebrated the wonders of the hunt on horseback, as his Manchu ancestors had. He consulted the I Ching for fortunes, but counseled his underlings to convey truthfully bad omens this was the equivalent, after all, of demanding honest research and science from his Bureau of Astronomy.

Kangxi clearly liked to experience things for himself, which adds to the piquancy and realism of the story. He questioned the keepers of Confucius's home about the layout and garden, and he wrote letters about the quality of noodles and grapes in different regions. I actually wished for more about how Kangxi governed China, but Spence does include some discussion of this.

Kangxi complains about the short and uninformative petitions and memorials he received at the palace from provincial underlings he was always, always responding to memorials, up to a day he said, as well as signing off on every execution and on every form of execution.

He describes his battle against recalcitrant former Ming generals, and the need for leniency when reincorporating their supporters. Kangxi wonders out loud about how to deal with the Jesuits who came to China, and mentions how he made them fill out registrations and forms and controlled their movements "some of their words were no different from the wild and improper teachings of the Buddhists and the Taoists"but how he also advised listening to them and learning about their technology.

He successfully defended the Jesuits who had moved to China earlier in the century, from a new Jesuit, de Tournan, who came from the Pope to corral those the church worried had adopted too many Chinese teachings.

The Empress of China | Revolvy

Each of these little anecdotes and stories and observations may seem disconnected, but they emerge as a comprehensible whole. This is a magnificent work of scholarship as well as a deft portrait of recognizable man, all the more amazing in that that man's life is almost impossible to imagine in the modern world.The Emperor of China: Self Portrait of K’nationwidesecretarial.com Jonathan D.

Spence (New York: Random House, Inc., Pp.

A synopsis of emperor of china self portrait of kang hsi

, $) Jonathan Spence’s work stands in a genre apart from that of historical fiction. This re-creation of the life of K'ang-hsi (), drawn from his letters, edicts, pardons and poems.

The Emperor K'ang-hsi was one of the greatest rulers in all China's year history, a man every bit as powerful as his two contemporaries, Peter the Great and Louis XIV. A Tang Dynasty Empress Wu Zetian.

A synopsis of emperor of china self portrait of kang hsi

Find this Pin and more on 魂塚 by 妙善 神曲. Wu Zeitan was a Chinese sovereign, who ruled officially under the name of her self-proclaimed "Zhou dynasty", from to She was the only female emperor of China in more than four millennia. on powells, also read synopsis and reviews.

a brave young miskito indian follows his wife from the land of the living to the spirit nationwidesecretarial.com legend of the eye - glbet-el - the legend of the “eyeâ€the legend of the “eye†(the chamsa hand.

an amulet against the ‘evil eye’).

Full Book Notes and Study Guides

A self portrait of Lian Suo, painted with remarkable detail, plays a key role in the courtship. At one point, the painting becomes a moving, speaking live-action image of Lian Suo and she leaps from it into the room, leaving a blank space on the painting. The fiction, Emperor of China: Self-portrait of K’ang-Hsi, is written by Jonathan D.

Spence in Based on various historical records and the letters written by K’ang Hsi Emperor, Spence creates a fictional memoir to describe K’ang Hsi’s later years.

This book is divided into six chapter.

Lian suo () - IMDb